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Mount Sinai Obituaries and Services » Edith Dellorco

Edith Dellorco

August 9, 1920 - November 30, 2015

Service Information Mount Sinai Simi Valley - Kamenir Chapel

Service Date: Sunday December 6th, 2015

Service Time: 12:30 pm

Mount Sinai Simi Valley - Kamenir Chapel

6150 Mount Sinai Drive

Simi Valley, CA 93063

Obituary Viewed 4594 times

Posted by:
Jonathan Rapp

Posted on:
December 6, 2015

I've known Edie all my life and I feel honored to have been able to observe her service on the Webcast. I am so saddened by her passing, and send my love to all her family. She was a huge figure in my life: my mother's best friend, her husband Fran my father's best friend, and her son Marc one of my group of four inseparable guys who I still count my closest amigos. She was a second mom to me through all the years our families were in and out of one another's homes, once the Dellorcos had lured us from Santa Monica to Laurel Canyon in 1960. Her commitment to family, humanitarianism and progressive causes, and her love of life was second to none. She was a tremendous force of good and positivity who gave more than took in every interaction, and so earned and deserved all the naches that came her way. May her memory be a blessing.

Posted by:
Audrey Coleman

Posted on:
December 6, 2015

My name is Eleanor Audrey Coleman-Macheret. If my memory is correct, my grandfather, Osher Mudrick, was the brother of Edie's mother. But my connection with this wonderful woman goes much deeper than distant family ties. I would love to be with you all to share the feelings of grief and loss while also acknowledging how enriched we have been by our relationship with her over the years. Instead I am on a plane heading towards Los Angeles after presenting a paper for the first time at the Society for Ethnomusicology annual conference. Before getting the sad news from Chris, I was expecting to call up Edie on Monday and recount the adventure. She had been very supportive of my return to graduate studies and the presentation was a milestone I wanted to share. If time permits, let me elaborate a bit on how Edie Dellorco and I are connected. Edie and my mother, who was her cousin, grew up in Toronto, Canada. They saw each other on family occasions. Edie and my Aunt Pearl became close friends as young women when they broke social barriers by attending university in Toronto and then in the U.S. for graduate studies in social work. Both went on to become medical social workers. Both married Americans, raising their families and building their careers in the United States. Growing up in the 1960s, I remember references to cousin Edie, a social worker like Auntie Pearl, who was out in California now – her life sounded exotic and free compared to straight-laced Toronto. Of course, my knowledge of Los Angeles was limited to Disneyland and avidly watching 77 Sunset Strip. When I actually moved to Los Angeles in 1978, Edie welcomed me as family. Within a short time, we became friends. We went to the theatre together, to art house movies, museums, concerts. For about ten years we met often at Zeidler’s Café at the Skirball Cultural Center -- roughly halfway between her home in Westlake Village and mine in Manhattan Beach. Sometimes we talked about the past. She helped me to understand how unusual it was that my grandmother built a ladies’ tailoring shop business in the center of downtown Toronto, catering to a non-Jewish clientele. I was enthralled that she had been friends with members of the folks singing group The Weavers, that Fran Dellorco had served as one of the bodyguards for the great singer and humanitarian Paul Robeson when the blacklisted performer gave a concert in upstate New York. We talked about our present situations – challenges she faced as a social worker at Children's Hospital and challenges her family was facing. I shared my insecurities about my writing and my decision to put my work as an adult educator in the foreground to gain financial stability. One thing was certain in our relationship: wherever I was in my life – married, divorced, remarried, working at this or that, back in school – I always felt completely accepted by Edie, never judged. After my parents passed away, the bond of our common heritage grew stronger. I was so happy to join in the celebrations of her 80th and 90th birthdays. When my sister Gloria and her husband came from Canada to visit me, Edie drove out to Zeidler’s Café to meet them and later visited them during one of her trips to Toronto. At that time, she joyfully met my niece Glynis and baby grandniece Anjeli. Edie had a firm foothold in the present but an eye toward the future as well. I have a photo my brother-in-law took of Edie, Gloria, Glynis, and Anjeli together – four generations in happy communion. I could say much more but for those listening/reading, I should probably have said much less. Thank you for allowing me to share. My condolences to all who love her and will miss her. With love, Audrey

Posted by:
Chris Dellorco

Posted on:
December 3, 2015

Posted by:
Chris Dellorco

Posted on:
December 3, 2015

Posted by:
Chris Dellorco

Posted on:
December 3, 2015

Posted by:
Chris Dellorco

Posted on:
December 3, 2015

Posted by:
Chris Dellorco

Posted on:
December 3, 2015

Posted by:
Chris Dellorco

Posted on:
December 3, 2015

Edith Judith Dellorco was born August 9th, 1920 in Toronto, Canada to two immigrant parents. Her father was from Austria and her mother was from the Ukraine. As a child, her parents spoke Yiddish in the house. She received her Master’s degree in Social work from the University of Pennsylvania where she met her husband, Francis Dellorco. Both Edith and Fran met and befriended many of the great folk artists of the time, Pete Seeger, Woody Guthrie, Lee Hays, and Ronnie Gilbert of the Weavers to name a few. They married in 1950, and then came west to settle in Hollywood CA. They soon moved to Laurel Canyon. Edith had two sons, Marc and Chris, and a daughter, Jan. She had 5 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Edith was a clinical social worker at Children’s Hospital for over 25 years. During her tenure there, she became the head of the social work department. She was a full-time working mom in an era when few women were in the workplace. She worked until she was 72 at Children’s Hospital and still saw patients well into her late 70’s. She always fought for progressive values and her life was dedicated to helping others, whether it was her work as a social worker, running community service programs or taking care of her family. She was always involved in some group activity, making the world a better place. Her high intellect, knowledge of current affairs and love of reading and healthy living were vital to keeping her sharp and engaged with life. Over the last eight years, she was very active in fundraising for Brandeis University. She recently developed a program to help battered woman for which she received the “Woman of the year” award from the Brandeis National Committee . Edith will be loved and remembered by the many people whom she has truly touched in her life. She leaves behind in each of us a hole that will never be filled. We will all deeply miss her.